skip navigation

Four Ways Playing Multiple Sports Can Help Your Child Become A Better Athlete

By USA Hockey, 06/16/14, 3:45PM MDT

Share

It's exciting to watch your children excel at the sports they love. Working hard toward a personal best or perfecting a specific technique are critical to success, but let’s not forget that playing multiple sports can be tremendously beneficial in the long run.

Branching out from just one sport offers youth athletes both physical and mental benefits, from enhancing current skills, to learning to appreciate the new skills required of a different sport. Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, has outlined four ways playing multiple sports can help your child become a better athlete and a more well-rounded person:

1. Mental Growth: Training in new sports can help open youth athletes’ minds to new experiences and, in turn, help them become better at their preferred game. When an athlete is accustomed to playing one sport, branching out to a new one may seem scary, but the challenge of learning a new sport can prove to be rewarding. And conquering that challenge may provide even greater confidence to fuel success in the athlete’s original sport.

2. Physical Improvements: Regardless of the sport your children most enjoy playing, many skills and techniques transfer across sports and complement each other. For example, water polo and softball both involve throwing, and both call for short bursts of energy, but water polo also requires sustained energy that can add a dimension of endurance that softball does not usually demand. The physical benefits of practicing new sports allows youth athletes to build upon their skills as well as discover previously unknown talents and abilities.

3. New Experiences: Many seasoned athletes know that playing multiple sports provides a great opportunity to gain perspective on different team roles and become a more well-rounded player. For example, if your child is the star forward on her soccer team, she might find it beneficial to learn a new role on a volleyball team.

4. Avoid “Burnout”: Parents can unknowingly put a lot of pressure on their kids to specialize in a sport or become ultra-competitive. Too much pressure can cause a child to become resentful, feel overwhelmed, or “burnt out” on a sport to the point of wanting to quit that sport – and maybe even quit all sports. Encouraging your children to take a break from one sport to try another can relieve stress and help their outlook.

It might be difficult to imagine your youth athletes starting a new sport, especially when they are good at the sport they love. But the love of the game can be the very reason that  you would suggest playing other sports, particularly once you realize how playing multiple sports can benefit your children’s mental health, fitness, and overall performance as they learn and grow athletically.

At Liberty Mutual Insurance, we constantly look for ways to celebrate the countless acts of responsibility and integrity shown by people every day. We created Responsible Sports, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance, as part of this belief to help ensure that our kids experience the best that sports have to offer in environments that promote and display good sportsmanship. We believe kids can learn valuable life lessons when coaches and parents come together to support winning on and off the field.

In an effort to benefit millions of youth athletes, parents and coaches, this article is among a series created exclusively for partners in the Liberty Mutual Insurance Responsible Sports program, powered by Positive Coaching Alliance.

©2014 Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and Positive Coaching Alliance. All rights reserved. This material may not be distributed without express written permission. Any reproduction in whole or part by and individuals or organizations will be held liable for copyright infringement to the full extent of the law.

Recent News

Most Popular Articles

Brandon Perrone Sets an Example in Net and in the Community

By Tom Robinson 05/16/2019, 8:45am MDT

New Jersey Titans goalie was honored with NAHL’s Community Service Award

Retention of Officials A Priority for USA Hockey

By Dane Mizutani 03/14/2019, 9:00pm MDT

Many sports across the board have begun to see a decline in their number of officials. USA Hockey is no different, with numbers lagging slightly behind player growth.

With that in mind, USA Hockey has made a particularly concerted effort over the last couple of years to incentivize officials to stick around.

Not surprisingly that was the main topic discussed at the annual USA Hockey's Winter Meetings, according to National Referee-in-Chief Dave LaBuda. 

“I'd say the overriding tone of the meeting was us talking about retention and trying to come up with ways in which to address that particular issue,” LaBuda said. “It's a very complex situation. There are a number of different factors that go into why an official decides not to stay registered. We can only address a certain number of those factors and the rest we have to hope fix themselves in some way.”

In an effort to be proactive, USA Hockey has implemented sweeping change in the registration process for existing officials.

It started by revamping the registration fees, and while some of the other minutiae is rather hard to digest, the most notable change is the reduction of registration requirements for officials that reach the Level 3 or Level 4 status. 

As soon as an official has obtained Level 3 or Level 4 status for three consecutive years, they will become eligible to apply for tenured status. In order to attain that tenured status, officials must also attend what USA Hockey is calling an advanced officiating symposium. 

“It's designed to encourage people to continue their level of registration and to advance to a higher level of registration,” LaBuda said. “Just getting them to climb that ladder and try to attain the highest level of registration will make them better officials, and in turn, improve the game.”

Essentially, USA Hockey wants to send a message to its officials, making it clear that their time is important to the organization. 

“We understand that people's time nowadays is becoming tighter and tighter,” LaBuda said. “We wanted to make sure that we made the entire process as efficient as possible from a time standpoint.”

It seems to be working so far as USA Hockey has been able to stabilize its registration numbers over the last few years, according to LaBuda.

“We are starting to see some movement in that retention area,” LaBuda said. “It seems like every sport is experiencing a critical loss of officials to work their sport. We are hoping that these changes in the registration process will help us retain more officials down the road. It’s been a positive step in the right direction so far.”

Manager of Communications

By USA Hockey 05/10/2019, 3:00pm MDT

Play active role in wide range of department initiatives, with focus on leading those involved with the U.S. Women’s National Team program.