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Parise to Captain 2014 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team

By USAHockey.com, 01/31/14, 11:30AM MST

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Captains Announcement Audio

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Zach Parise (Minneapolis, Minn./Minnesota Wild/University of North Dakota), who served as an alternate captain for the silver medal-winning 2010 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team, has been named captain of the 2014 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team it was announced today by USA Hockey. Parise is in his second season as an alternate captain with the National Hockey League's Minnesota Wild.

The XXII Olympic Winter Games will be held Feb. 7-23 in Sochi, Russia. The United States plays Slovakia in its first game Feb. 13.

In Vancouver, British Columbia, at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games, Parise tied for the team lead in both goals (four) and points (eight) and was named to the media all-star team.

Parise, who served as both captain and alternate captain over the course of his tenure playing for the New Jersey Devils, was an alternate captain on the gold medal-winning 2004 U.S. National Junior Team, as well as the 2008 U.S. Men's National Team. He also competed at two other International Ice Hockey Federation Men's World Championships (2005, 2007), the 2003 IIHF World Junior Championship and was a member of the gold medal-winning 2002 US. Men's National Under-18 Team at the IIHF Men's Under-18 World Championship.

Parise has collected 482 points (230-252) in 591 games played during a nine-year NHL career that includes stints with the Minnesota Wild (2012-present) and New Jersey Devils (2005-12). He has played in the Stanley Cup Playoffs seven times and helped guide the Devils to the 2012 Stanley Cup Final.

BROWN, SUTER TO SERVE AS ALTERNATE CAPTAINS

Dustin Brown (Ithaca, N.Y./Los Angeles Kings) and Ryan Suter (Madison, Wis./Minnesota Wild/University of Wisconsin) have been tabbed as alternate captains for the 2014 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team.

Brown, who is in his sixth season as captain of the Los Angeles Kings, served as an alternate captain of the 2010 Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team. He also captained the 2009 U.S. Men's National Team at the IIHF Men's World Championship. Brown, who is making his eighth appearance with Team USA in international competition, played for the United States in three other IIHF Men's World Championships (2004-bronze, 2006, 2008) and two IIHF World Junior Championships (2002, 2003).

Suter, who was an alternate captain on his first U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team in 2010, is currently in his second season as alternate captain with the Minnesota Wild. He previously served as captain of the 2005 U.S. National Junior Team that played in the IIHF World Junior Championship. Suter has been a member of Team USA at four IIHF Men's World Championships (2005, 2006, 2007, 2009), three IIHF World Junior Championships (2003, 2004-gold, 2005) and two IIHF Men's Under-18 World Championships (2002-gold, 2003).

NOTES: The 25-man roster for the 2014 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team was announced on NBC as part of its coverage of the Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic on Jan. 1 at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Mich. ... Dan Bylsma, head coach of the Pittsburgh Penguins, is the head coach of the 2014 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team. Tony Granato, assistant coach with the Pittsburgh Penguins, Todd Richards, head coach of the Columbus Blue Jackets, and Peter Laviolette, serve as assistant coaches ... USA Hockey's International Council, chaired by Gavin Regan, vice president of USA Hockey, has oversight responsibilities for all U.S. National Teams.

U.S. Men's Olympic Ice Hockey Team All-Time Captains

Jamie Langenbrunner (2010)

Chris Chelios (1998, 2002, 2006)

Peter Laviolette (1994)

Clark Donatelli (1992)

Brian Leetch (1988)

Phil Verchota (1984)

Mike Eruzione (1980)

John Taft (1976)

Tim Sheehy (1972)

Lou Nanne (1968)

Herb Brooks/ Bill Reichert (1964)

Jack Kirrane (1960)

Gene Campbell (1956)

Al Van (1952)

Goodwin Harding (1948)

Jack Garrison (1936)

John Chase (1932)

Irving Small (1924)

Joe McCormick (1920)

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ANSWER: While the initial shot was "on goal" in this situation, the face-off must be located in the neutral zone due to the fact that the puck did not redirect out of play off of the goal frame, boards or protective glass.

 

QUESTION: An attacking player takes a shot towards the goal, which is deflected by a teammate, and is redirected off of the goal frame and out of play. Where is the ensuing face-off?

ANSWER: The "spirit and intent" of Rule 612.c is to reward a close scoring play with an attacking end-zone face-off. In this case, the face-off should be located in the attacking zone since the initial shot and deflection struck the goal frame and directly left the playing surface.

 

QUESTIONIs there an acceptable time to be a 3rd man in, in an effort for player safety? If one player is on the ground, defenseless, is it acceptable for a 3rd player to try to stop the player throwing punches?

ANSWER: There is never an acceptable time for an additional player to enter a 1 on 1 altercation. In almost all cases, the game officials will enter the altercation as soon as the players fall to the ice or when things become unfair for one player. Additionally, an additional player entering an altercation would turn it into a 2 on 1 altercation which would be regarded as very unfair and dangerous for the opponent.

 

QUESTIONHi, I’m looking for a business opportunity, and it is a foldable Hockey stick. Would this be legal in the rules or no?

ANSWER: Rule 301(a) in the USA Hockey Playing Rules states,

“The sticks shall be made of wood or other material approved by the Rules Committee, and must not have any projections.”

Since a “foldable” stick would likely have some type of hinge that would project from the natural shape of the stick shaft, this would unlikely be approved for use by the USAH Playing Rules Committee.

 

QUESTIONWhat penalty, if any, is called against a player who attacks his own teammate. The rule book deals with penalties against "an opponent or opposing player" but does not refer to infractions against one's own teammates. For arguments sake, the player slashes and injures a teammates with intent.

ANSWER: The USAH Playing Rules Casebook does have a situation under Rule 615 that deals with two teammates who fight during a game, but since the likelihood of a player slashing a teammate during a game is extremely rare this type of behavior would be left to the coach to deal with. Please note, the Playing Rules only apply to games. Any bad behavior in practice should be dealt with by the coach and team manager.

 

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ANSWER: If players remove their helmets prior to an altercation, they must be assessed a Match penalty in addition to any other penalties they earn during the altercation (Fighting, Roughing, etc.). In other words, the normal Fighting penalties would be assessed for the fight, but they must be assessed the additional Match for removing their helmets prior to the fight.

 

QUESTIONI have always wanted to be a Ice Hockey referee ever since I stopped playing sled hockey. I was wondering what the guidelines are in terms of someone who is disabled and can’t walk (I have a medical condition that does not allow me to walk and have any function from the waist down and have to use a wheelchair to move about) would this pose any challenges in terms of becoming a referee for able bodied Ice Hockey?

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