skip navigation

Eating right is part of the game for Lyndsey Fry

By Justin A. Rice - Special to USAHockey.com, 12/12/13, 6:00PM MST

Share

Lyndsey Fry said she’s a “nut” when it comes to eating healthy. But over Thanksgiving, Fry, one of 23 women competing for 21 spots on Team USA for the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games, took a break not only from hockey but also from counting calories.

“Well, I’m a pretty big believer that sometimes when it comes to food, as far as the negative affects of eating badly for a day or two, I think the positive mental affects outweigh the negative healthy affects,” Fry said Tuesday, after she returned from her Thanksgiving holiday in Arizona. “I enjoyed my Thanksgiving. I definitely went for an extra plate or two.

“I didn’t track [calories] when I was home; I just made smart choices. Now I’m back to tracking it.”

The 21-year-old Harvard University student estimated that she burns close to 800 to 900 calories in a two-hour practice with the U.S. Olympic Women’s Team, which is training in Bedford, Mass., just outside Boston.

“It depends on the drills we’re doing and how much standing around,” she said. “It’s a lot of calories, and if you add an off-ice workout during the day you definitely burn a lot more.”

She said she takes in about 2,400 calories a day, not counting Thanksgiving of course.

“I could probably eat more and be fine, but I am still trying to very slowly lean out,” she said. “It’s been a long process over the years. I probably eat less than some of my teammates, but not to the point where I’m under eating.”

That mentality obviously went out the door during Thanksgiving dinner at her aunt’s house.

“I never used to be a stuffing kid,” she said when asked about her favorite sides. “I did not enjoy stuffing until now.”

But Fry, who also knows her way around a kitchen, said she didn’t totally pig out on Thanksgiving. She said she made an upside down pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving with more healthy ingredients than traditional pumpkin pie.

“I baked it myself, and instead of crust I used low fat gram crackers on top,” she said. “I made that. That was pretty good.”

She also made a breakfast hash while she was home and a spaghetti squash.

Fry said she heeded her coaches’ advice before the team broke up for the holiday break.

“When we left they said enjoy your break, but don’t forget this is a job,” Fry said. “When you take that mentality, I’m not going to sit on my butt eating turkey and ice cream at home. I’m going to make smart choices, and I’m sure most of us did.”

Fry didn’t bring her hockey gear home, but ice skating was mostly out of the question anyhow since she spent the long weekend in Arizona. Along with teammate Megan Bozek — who also spent the weekend in Arizona at her brother’s house — Fry believes she spent the weekend in the warmest climate of anyone on the team.

Going from the cold Massachusetts climate to Arizona and then back to the cold again made the team’s first practice after Thanksgiving a bit difficult on Fry’s lungs.

“My lungs were burning because I didn’t have any cold air in my lungs,” she said. “It was 65 [degrees] at home.”

Otherwise, she said she felt refreshed after the break, especially since they had two weeks of hard practice going into Thanksgiving.

“I think it was really good mentally and physically having a break,” she said. “I’m not sore from yesterday. I feel pretty good. I think the break was definitely needed.”

Especially since practices will only get more intense as the team inches closer to cutting the roster down to the 21 players that will go to the Winter Games. That roster will be announced during the 2014 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic in Detroit on Jan. 1.

If Fry makes the team, it would not only be the realization of her own childhood dream, but it would also fulfill a teenage pledge she made with her best friend and teammate, Liz Turgeon, who was killed in a car crash in 2010 near Albuquerque, N.M.

“It would be absolutely incredible for so many reasons,” said Fry, who is featured on the cover of USA Hockey Magazine this month holding Turgeon’s jersey. “There’s been a big focus lately with me and the story with Liz and the promise we had and that absolutely holds true.

“But it’s not just for her. It’s for my family and everyone who ever supported me. My Harvard friends, kids growing up, so many people. If I can take all that to the Olympics, that would be the greatest feeling in the world. It would be the ultimate way for me to give back to everyone who’s played a role in my life.”

 

Story from Red Line Editorial, Inc.

Recent News

Most Popular Articles

Changes to the Registration Process for the 2022-23 Season

By USA Hockey 07/15/2022, 1:00pm MDT

Q-and-A with USA Hockey’s Director of Officiating Education Program Matt Leaf

The Referee Section of USA Hockey recently met during Annual Congress and discussed a variety of issues that will have an impact in the success of the officiating program. Many of those issues relate back to the successful completion of the registration requirements and the retention of officials.

Streamlining the registration process and maximizing the efficiency of our educational platforms are always a priority and the following Q-and-A will highlight those changes that every official should be aware of heading into the new season.

USA Hockey: What is the biggest change made to the registration requirements for this season?

Matt Leaf: With more and more seminars transitioning to a virtual format, the Referees-in-Chief (RIC) have determined that there really is no need for the closed book exams. So, level 2, 3 and 4 officials this season will no longer be required to submit a closed book (or modified online closed book exam) upon completion of the seminar requirement. Instead, the open book exams have been expanded to 75 questions for level 2 and 100 questions each for level 3 and level 4.

The RICs acknowledged that the purpose of the exams has always been as a means to encourage rule knowledge, so more effort was made to put together open book exam questions that will encourage the officials to open the Rules/Casebook in an effort to not only learn the rule, but more importantly, understand the spirit and intent of the rule.

USAH: Are there any other changes to the exam process

ML: The only other change to the exams deal with those who do not pass the original exam. Level 2, 3 and 4 officials will now be able to complete their retake exam 24 hours after failing their original exam. Level 1 officials will still need to wait seven days as we want them to slow down and take some time reviewing the rules so they can gain a better understanding and improve their chances for success on the ice.

USAH: What changes, if any, have been made to the seminars? Are all officials still required to attend a seminar each season?

ML: Yes, except for Tenured Officials, all officials are required to attend a seminar for the level that they apply for each season. So, a Level 1 official must attend a Level 1 seminar, Level 2 attends a Level 2 and then Level 3 and 4 seminars will be combined as one seminar in many cases.

Level 1 officials are strongly encouraged to attend a seminar in their own area and most areas will mainly conduct in-person Level 1 seminars. Although there will be some hybrid Level 1 seminars with both a virtual and in-person component, the key here is that every Level 1 official is required to attend a Level 1 seminar ice session. This may require some additional coordination of scheduling for these new officials, but the reality is this on-ice practice is so critical to any future success they may have on the ice that the RICs feel it is critical that the ice session is part of their educational experience.

Level 2 seminars will also include an on-ice component that Level 2 officials need to be aware of when they plan their seminar attendance. The vast majority of Level 3 and Level 4 seminars will be virtual and officials are encouraged to attend a seminar at a date and time that is convenient for them.

USAH: Have there been any changes to the curriculum for the various levels?

ML: The curriculum for each level was standardized prior to last season and is something that will continue to be updated on an annual basis. The specific presentations, along with the video examples, have all been developed in a manner that provides valuable information specific to each level with new presentations and updated video examples being used to keep things fresh and relevant. In addition, the seminar curriculum has been coordinated with the online modules to minimize duplication and to diversify the required education for each level.

USAH: How about SafeSport and Screening – any changes to those requirements?

ML: The background screening process will remain the same as USA Hockey is required to conduct a national screen every two years on any official who is 18 years of age as of June 1 of the registration year (in this case 2022). Both the background screen and the SafeSport training are mandated by the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC) per the Amateur Sports Act initiated by Congress.

For SafeSport, any official who was born in 2005, or earlier, is required to complete SafeSport training on a yearly basis. This may include the full training or refresher training that is managed by the US Center for SafeSport. Although it will not have an impact on registration for this season, there was a change in SafeSport that has been made where the training will only be valid for a 12-month period of time and it not consistent with an overlapping season. This will be addressed during the summer of 2023.

USAH: Are there any other changes or areas of emphasis that you want officials to be aware of?

ML: A significant part of the discussions that took place with the RICs focused on the importance mentoring plays in the success and, ultimately, the retention of brand-new officials. USA Hockey loses 50% of our new officials every season and improving that retention rate by just 15% will result in 1,000 additional experienced officials joining our ranks each year. We need to do a better job of bringing new officials into the fold and then supporting them in ways that sets them up for a successful and rewarding experience. The RICs feel strongly the best way to positively impact this issue is through mentoring.

Experienced officials should expect to receive information later this summer that outlines expectations of a formal Mentor Program and asking them to volunteer their time and expertise to become involved as a mentor. Once we have established a pool of officials that are willing to contribute in this way to the next generation of officials, they will be assigned a group of new officials they can reach out to and guide them through the registration process, seminar attendance, assistance in completing the open book exam and reaching out to prospective assignors when the time has come they are ready to work games. Once they have stepped on the ice, that mentor can continue to be a valuable resource for the new official and provide the necessary support needed to be successful. We will also be encouraging local clubs, assignors and officials’ groups to implement Shadow Programs that will complement the Mentor Program and positively enhance the officials’ experience even more.

With everyone working together towards a common goal, USA Hockey can become a leader in addressing the officiating crisis while providing a positive experience to our next generation of officials.

3 Tips for Measuring Your Powders

By USA Hockey 04/11/2017, 11:00am MDT

Useful tips when getting ready to mix up a shake

Coordinator, Youth Officiating

By USA Hockey 08/10/2022, 4:15pm MDT

Coordinate officiating best practices, long-term officiating development initiatives and day-to-day support