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Terreri headlines ADM goaltending clinic in New Jersey

By USA Hockey, 02/15/17, 1:45PM MST

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Feb. 15, 2017 | Forty aspiring boys and girls goaltenders turned New Jersey’s Prudential Center practice facility into a puck-stoppers paradise last week during an American Development Model youth goaltending clinic led by the New Jersey Devils and USA Hockey.
 
Phil Osaer, USA Hockey’s ADM manager for goaltending, helped provide the training, which included a presentation for parents and coaches in addition to on-ice guidance for the athletes. New Jersey Devils goaltending coach Chris Terreri, a U.S. Olympian in 1988, also worked with the participants on and off the ice. Terreri has a long history with USA Hockey, dating back to his own youth goaltending days. In 1975, he led his team from Warwick, Rhode Island, to a USA Hockey national championship. He later competed for Team USA at the IIHF Men’s World Championship in 1985, 1986, 1987 and 1997.
 
“It was an honor to have Chris join us for the clinic and it was great to work with so many enthusiastic goalies, coaches and parents,” said Osaer. “One thing that stood out to me was Chris emphasizing the importance of young goalies playing multiple sports. It benefits them in terms of developing their all-around athleticism, which will help them become better goalies, and also in terms of avoiding injuries.”



Chris Terreri as a U.S. Olympian in 1988. The Rhode Island native, who played 14 seasons in the NHL, helped conduct last week's ADM goaltending clinic in New Jersey.

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"It was basically a mini-NARCE," said Martel. "We talked about club development and player development, Phil and Goose led on-ice sessions and Roger went in-depth on coaching. It was a good event and a good opportunity to share ideas with the coaches and directors in Minnesota."

Dave Margenau, president of Minnesota Hockey, called it "an inspiring couple of days" and said that attendees "left with a tremendous amount of excitement." 

Going cross-ice in Canada

By USA Hockey 03/27/2017, 3:15pm MDT

March 27, 2017 | When USA Hockey implemented its American Development Model in 2009, one element of the nationwide age-appropriate training blueprint sparked more debate than any other: cross-ice hockey for 8U players. In the years since, an abundance of evidence, both data-driven and anecdotal, has proven the developmental advantages of cross-ice hockey.

This week, Hockey Canada announced that it too will introduce its players to the game through cross-ice play beginning in 2017-18.

“Re-sizing the playing surface to cross-ice or half-ice means more puck touches, which result in more chances to practice puck control and shooting, as well as overall more movement and motor skill-development – twisting, turning, balance, coordination, agility,” said Paul Carson, vice-president of membership development for Hockey Canada, in a release today. “Their field-of-play matches their size, and these players hone in on their skill-development in a way that larger ice surfaces just aren’t conducive to.”

The Grassroots Show on Ottawa’s TSN 1200 weighed in on the decision. Click the audio link below to hear how Canada is embracing cross-ice hockey for the coming season and beyond.

Tom Renney, president and CEO of Hockey Canada, appeared on the Grassroots Show to discuss the nationwide shift to cross-ice hockey, beginning this fall for 5- and 6-year-olds and expanding to all of Canada's Novice (8U) level in 2018-19.

“When you see 10 or 12 or 14 or 16 kids out on the ice in between periods and they’re playing 200-by-85 and 3 or 4 kids touch the puck in that whole six minutes, yet there’s people in the stands clapping and thinking it’s wonderful, I just can’t help but think about the 95 percent of the children that didn’t even touch the puck or get from one end of the rink to the other and I ask myself what are we doing when the opportunity is certainly there to have 30 kids on the ice playing cross-ice and everyone is having a much better opportunity to touch the puck, skate a shorter distance and really play. It just boggles my mind,” said Renney.

“We completely embrace, at the Initiation level and the Novice level, cross-ice hockey and we have mandated that in the Initiation program and we will mandate it across the country in Novice hockey.

“This is about the pure enjoyment of the game, and your first connection with it has to be something that’s pure fun, on a surface of play that is conducive to much more participation and joy.”