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Star Panel Closes Coaches Symposium

08/24/2014, 11:00pm MDT
By USAHockey.com

USA Hockey's National Hockey Coaches Symposium wrapped Sunday with a presentation from 2014 U.S. Men's Olympic Team head coach Dan Bylsma and an all-star coaching panel at the JW Marriott.

The panel was moderated by 1984 U.S. Olympic coach Lou Vairo and included Bylsma, Igor Larionov, John Vanbiesbrouck and Tim Watters. A selection of their quotes is below.

What They Said

Tim Watters - Longtime NHL defenseman

"I thought all my youth coaches gave me little nuggets I could take away ... What I remember most were the coaches that taught me the life lessons. I can't remember the exact skills they taught me, but I remember the values they taught me."

"Find a mentor who can be really honest with you because there are some hard decisions to make with players ... A mentor that has gone through it and you can trust and confide in is probably the best advice I can give to young coaches."

"Growing up I played baseball, rugby in high school and volleyball in high school and of those three I would say volleyball helped the most (with hockey) ... there is no question that multiple sports helped me train for hockey."

Dan Bylsma - Head coach, 2014 U.S. Men's Olympic Team

"I was a rec league player, we didn't have any practices. A lot of my hockey and instruction was on a rink in the backyard. It was done with small-ice games and that's where I practiced. That was my dad and brothers. You learn the game that way."

"Teach them the game, teach them the skills, give them an opportuity to be their very best."

"A lot of the training off ice I got from playing other sports. ... I would encourage not dedicating 12 months of the year to hockey."

John Vanbiesbrouck - Legendary goaltender

"The coaches that I really liked the most were the ones that asked me questions and got to know what made me tick."

"Teaching happens in practice, it doesn't happen in a game ... the players just can't take it in at that time. You manage in a game, you don't teach. That's why practice is so important."

"I don't like to see hockey dominate and become stale for young players."

Igor Larionov - Hockey Hall of Famer

"You have to encourage the kids to enjoy hockey and enjoy their time on the ice. They are going to make mistakes, you are there to show them how to do it right. I like when a coach is there to not break or punish the young player for making a mistake."

"The young boys and girls, when they come to practice, they are looking up to you, they want to learn and have fun but at the same time they want to get better every single day."

Lou Vairo - Head coach, 1984 U.S. Men's Olympic Team

"We're nothing as an organization without (coaches) and you are deeply appreciated."

Recent News

USA Hockey's National Hockey Coaches Symposium wrapped Sunday with a presentation from 2014 U.S. Men's Olympic Team head coach Dan Bylsma and an all-star coaching panel at the JW Marriott.

The panel was moderated by 1984 U.S. Olympic coach Lou Vairo and included Bylsma, Igor Larionov, John Vanbiesbrouck and Tim Watters. A selection of their quotes is below.

What They Said

Tim Watters - Longtime NHL defenseman

"I thought all my youth coaches gave me little nuggets I could take away ... What I remember most were the coaches that taught me the life lessons. I can't remember the exact skills they taught me, but I remember the values they taught me."

"Find a mentor who can be really honest with you because there are some hard decisions to make with players ... A mentor that has gone through it and you can trust and confide in is probably the best advice I can give to young coaches."

"Growing up I played baseball, rugby in high school and volleyball in high school and of those three I would say volleyball helped the most (with hockey) ... there is no question that multiple sports helped me train for hockey."

Dan Bylsma - Head coach, 2014 U.S. Men's Olympic Team

"I was a rec league player, we didn't have any practices. A lot of my hockey and instruction was on a rink in the backyard. It was done with small-ice games and that's where I practiced. That was my dad and brothers. You learn the game that way."

"Teach them the game, teach them the skills, give them an opportuity to be their very best."

"A lot of the training off ice I got from playing other sports. ... I would encourage not dedicating 12 months of the year to hockey."

John Vanbiesbrouck - Legendary goaltender

"The coaches that I really liked the most were the ones that asked me questions and got to know what made me tick."

"Teaching happens in practice, it doesn't happen in a game ... the players just can't take it in at that time. You manage in a game, you don't teach. That's why practice is so important."

"I don't like to see hockey dominate and become stale for young players."

Igor Larionov - Hockey Hall of Famer

"You have to encourage the kids to enjoy hockey and enjoy their time on the ice. They are going to make mistakes, you are there to show them how to do it right. I like when a coach is there to not break or punish the young player for making a mistake."

"The young boys and girls, when they come to practice, they are looking up to you, they want to learn and have fun but at the same time they want to get better every single day."

Lou Vairo - Head coach, 1984 U.S. Men's Olympic Team

"We're nothing as an organization without (coaches) and you are deeply appreciated."

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