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U.S. Players Highlight NCAA Men's Frozen Four Rosters

04/09/2014, 1:30pm MDT
By USA Hockey

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - The NCAA Men's Frozen Four will once again feature an abundantly American presence, including 82 of the 104 players on the rosters of Boston College, Union College, the University of Minnesota and the University of North Dakota with developmental roots in the United States.

The NCAA Men's Frozen Four begins Thursday (April 10) at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, with Boston College taking on Union and Minnesota facing North Dakota.

Among the Frozen Four participants, 12 are alumni of USA Hockey's National Team Development Program in Ann Arbor, Mich. Fifteen players have skated for a U.S. National Team -- including the U.S. National Junior Team and the U.S. Men's National Under-18 Team -- and have combined to win 15 medals in International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships.

Fifty-seven American players spent time in the United States Hockey League, USA Hockey's only Tier I junior league, which includes the two teams from USA Hockey's NTDP. There are five players with connections to the Tier II North American Hockey League. Eight players have a background in the Eastern Junior Hockey League and one has played in the Minnesota Junior Hockey League.

A total of 18 states and the District of Columbia will be represented by players in the Frozen Four, including, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin.

Thirty-one American players competing in the Frozen Four have been drafted by National Hockey League teams.

Notes: Taylor Cammarata (Minnesota) received USA Hockey's Dave Tyler Junior Player of the Year award in 2013 ... Johnny Gaudreau (Boston College) and Jeff Taylor (Union) helped Dubuque win the 2011 USHL Clark Cup Playoff Championship. Jordan Schmaltz (North Dakota) helped Green Bay win the 2012 Clark Cup Playoff Championship ... Don Lucia, head coach at Minnesota, has served in a variety of coaching roles for USA Hockey, including head coach of the 2014 U.S. National Junior Team and the 1996 U.S. Select-16 Team. He also worked as an assistant coach on the 1995 U.S. Men's Select Team ... Grant Potulny, assistant coach at Minnesota, worked in that same role for the gold medal-winning 2013 U.S. National Junior Team ... Greg Brown, associate head coach at Boston College, was an assistant coach with the 2014 U.S. National Junior Team and skated for the 1988 and 1992 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Teams ...Mike Ayers, assistant coach at Boston College, was a coach at USA Hockey's National Team Development Program from 2011-13. Ayers was honored as the USA Hockey College Player of the Year in 2003 ... Marty McInnis, assistant coach at Boston College, skated for the 1992 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team ... Dave Hakstol, head coach of North Dakota, served as head coach of the USHL's Sioux City Musketeers from 1996-2000.

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USA Hockey's NTDP Alumni (12)

Name School Year(s)
Bill Arnold Boston College 2009-10
Gage Ausmus North Dakota 2011-13
Travis Boyd Minnesota 2009-11
Thatcher Demko Boston College 2012-13
Hudson Fasching Minnesota 2011-13
Rocco Grimaldi North Dakota 2009-11
Nick Mattson North Dakota 2007-09
Steven Santini Boston College 2011-13
Scott Savage Boston College 2011-13
Brendan Silk Boston College 2010-12
Brady Skjei Minnesota 2010-12
Keaton Thompson North Dakota 2011-13

U.S. National Junior Team Alumni (11)

Name School Year
Bill Arnold Boston College 2012
Thatcher Demko Boston College 2014
Hudson Fasching Minnesota 2014
Johnny Gaudreau Boston College 2013-gold
Shayne Gostisbehere Union 2013-gold
Rocco Grimaldi North Dakota 2013-gold
Ian McCoshen Boston College 2014
Kyle Rau Minnesota 2012
Mike Reilly Minnesota 2013-gold
Steven Santini Boston College 2014
Brady Skjei Minnesota 2014

U.S. Men's National U18 Team Alumni (10)

Name School Year(s)
Bill Arnold Boston College 2010-gold
Gage Ausmus North Dakota 2013-silver
Travis Boyd Minnesota 2011-gold
Thatcher Demko Boston College 2013-silver
Hudson Fasching Minnesota 2013-silver
Rocco Grimaldi North Dakota 2011-gold
2010-gold
Nick Mattson North Dakota 2009-gold
Steven Santini Boston College 2013-silver
Brady Skjei Minnesota 2012-gold
Keaton Thompson North Dakota 2013-silver

CCM/USAH All-American Prospects Game Alumni (10)

Name School Year
Gage Ausmus North Dakota 2012
Taylor Cammarata Minnesota 2012
Thatcher Demko Boston College 2013
Hudson Fasching Minnesota 2012
Ryan Fitzgerald Boston College 2012
Luke Johnson North Dakota 2012
Ian McCoshen Boston College 2012
Steven Santini Boston College 2012
Scott Savage Boston College 2012
Keaton Thompson North Dakota 2012

U.S. Junior Select Team Alumni (15)

Name School Year(s)
Seth Ambroz Minnesota 2010-1st Place
Taylor Cammarata Minnesota 2012-1st Place
Austin Cangelosi Boston College 2012-1st Place
2011-3rd Place
Ryan Fitzgerald Boston College 2012-1st Place
Zane Gothberg North Dakota 2011-3rd Place
2010-1st Place
Luke Johnson North Dakota 2012-1st Place
Justin Kloos Minnesota 2012-1st Place
Nick Mattson North Dakota 2010-1st Place
2009-1st Place
Ian McCoshen Boston College 2011-3rd Place
A.J. Michaelson Minnesota 2011-3rd Place
Michael Parks North Dakota 2010-1st Place
2009-1st Place
Mike Reilly Minnesota 2011-3rd Place
Jordan Schmaltz North Dakota 2011-3rd Place
2010-1st Place
Colten St. Clair North Dakota 2010-1st Place
2009-1st Place
Sam Warning Minnesota 2010-1st Place

U.S. U18 Select Team Alumni (18)

Name School Year
Seth Ambroz Minnesota 2010-2nd Place
Thatcher Demko Boston College 2012
Theo DiPauli Union 2010-2nd Place
Teddy Doherty Boston College 2011
Johnny Gaudreau Boston College 2010-2nd Place
Zane Gothberg North Dakota 2009
Gabe Guertler Minnesota 2012
Kevin Hayes Boston College 2009
Christian Isackson Minnesota 2009
Luke Johnson North Dakota 2011
Vinni Lettieri Minnesota 2012
Ben Marshall Minnesota 2009
Michael Parks North Dakota 2009
Kyle Rau Minnesota 2009
Tom Serratore Minnesota 2006
Brendan Silk Boston College 2011
Colten St. Clair North Dakota 2009
Sam Warning Minnesota 2009

U.S. U17 Select Team Alumni (13)

Name School Year
Bill Arnold Boston College 2008-2nd Place
Michael Brodzinski Minnesota 2011-1st Place
Thatcher Demko Boston College 2011-1st Place
Teddy Doherty Boston College 2010-1st Place
Ryan Fitzgerald Boston College 2010-1st Place
Gabe Guertler Minnesota 2011-1st Place
Christian Isackson Minnesota 2008-2nd Place
Vinni Lettieri Minnesota 2011-1st Place
Ben Marshall Minnesota 2008-2nd Place
A.J. Michaelson Minnesota 2010-1st Place
Michael Parks North Dakota 2008-2nd Place
Jordan Schmaltz North Dakota 2009
Tom Serratore Minnesota 2005-1st Place

NAHL Alumni (5)

Name School Team(s)
Ryan Coyne Minnesota Aberdeen, Chicago, Texas
Connor Gaarder North Dakota Coulee Region
Paul LaDue North Dakota Alexandria
Jake Parenteau Minnesota Alaska
Michael Shibrowski Minnesota Owatonna

USA Hockey Junior Tier III League Alumni (11)

Name School Team (League)
Bill Arnold Boston College Boston (EmJHL)
Brad Barone Boston College South Shore (EJHL)
Brian Billett Boston College New Hampshire (EJHL/EmJHL)
Chris Calnan Boston College South Shore (EJHL)
Nick Cruice Union South Shore (EJHL)
Ryan Fitzgerald Boston College Valley (EJHL)
Griffyn Martin Union Boston (EmJHL)
Max Novak Union Jersey (EJHL)
Jake Parenteau Minnesota Edina (MnJHL)
Steven Santini Boston College New York (EJHL), Brewster (Empire)
Colin Stevens Union Boston (EJHL)

USHL Alumni

Name School USHL Team(s)
Seth Ambroz Minnesota Omaha
Jake Bischoff Minnesota Omaha
Michael Brodzinski Minnesota Muskegon
Drake Caggiula North Dakota Des Moines
Taylor Cammarata Minnesota Waterloo
Austin Cangeloski Boston College Youngstown
Bryn Chyzyk North Dakota Fargo
Sam Coatta Union Sioux Falls
Nate Condon Minnesota Fargo
Thatcher Demko Boston College Omaha
Theo DiPauli Union Chicago
Teddy Doherty Boston College Dubuque
Johnny Gaudreau Boston College Dubuque
Matthew Gaurdeau Boston College Omaha
Adam Gilmour Boston College Muskegon
Sebastiel Gingras Union Muskegon
Zane Gothberg North Dakota Fargo
Gabe Guertler Minnesota Fargo
Justin Holl Minnesota Omaha
Christian Isackson Minnesota Sioux Falls
Luke Johnson North Dakota Lincoln
Justin Kloos Minnesota Waterloo
Matt Krug Union Indiana
Paul LaDue North Dakota Lincoln
Vinni Lettieri Minnesota Lincoln
Eli Lichtenwald Union Omaha
Ben Marshall Minnesota Omaha
Michael Matheson Boston College Dubuque
Nick Mattson North Dakota Indiana
Ian McCoshen Boston College Waterloo
A.J. Michaelson Minnesota Waterloo
Andrew Panzarella North Dakota Waterloo, Des Moines, Tri-City
Michael Parks North Dakota Cedar Rapids
Kyle Rau Minnesota Sioux Falls
Connor Reilly Minnesota Sioux Falls
Ryan Reilly Minnesota Sioux Falls
Alex Sakellaropoulos Union Chicago
Jordan Schmaltz North Dakota Green Bay, Sioux City
Tom Serratore Minnesota Sioux City, Youngstown
Michael Shibrowski Minnesota Des Moines
Michael Sit Boston College Chicago
Quinn Smith Boston College Youngstown
Colten St. Clair North Dakota Fargo
Jeff Taylor Union Dubuque
Keaton Thompson North Dakota Fargo
Mike Vecchione Union Tri-City
Sam Warning Minnesota Cedar Rapids
Adam Wilcox Minnesota Green Bay, Tri-City

NHL Entry Draft Selections (31)

Name School Draft Year NHL Team Round Pick
Seth Ambroz Minnesota 2011 CBJ 5 128
Bill Arnold Boston College 2010 CGY 4 108
Jake Bischoff Minnesota 2012 NYI 7 185
Travis Boyd Minnesota 2011 WSH 6 177
Michael Brodzinski Minnesota 2013 SJ 5 141
Chris Calnan Boston College 2012 CHI 3 79
Taylor Cammarata Minnesota 2013 NYI 3 76
Nate Condon Minnesota 2008 COL 7 200
Hudson Fasching Minnesota 2013 LA 4 118
Ryan Fitzgerald Boston College 2013 BOS 4 120
Johnny Gaurdeau Boston College 2011 CGY 4 104
Adam Gilmour Boston College 2012 MIN 4 98
Shayne Gostisbehere Union 2012 PHI 3 78
Zane Gothberg North Dakota 2010 BOS 6 165
Rocco Grimaldi North Dakota 2011 FLA 2 33
Kevin Hayes Boston College 2010 CHI 1 24
Justin Holl Minnesota 2010 CHI 2 54
Christian Isackson Minnesota 2010 BUF 7 203
Luke Johnson North Dakota 2013 CHI 5 134
Paul LaDue North Dakota 2012 LA 6 191
Ben Marshall Minnesota 2010 DET 7 201
Nick Mattson North Dakota 2010 CHI 6 180
Ian McCoshen Boston College 2013 FLA 2 31
Michael Parks North Dakota 2010 PHI 5 149
Kyle Rau Minnesota 2011 FLA 3 91
Mike Reilly Minnesota 2011 CBJ 4 98
Steven Santini Boston College 2013 NJ 2 42
Jordan Schmaltz North Dakota 2012 STL 1 25
Brady Skjei Minnesota 2012 NYR 1 28
Keaton Thompson North Dakota 2013 ANA 3 87
Adam Wilcox Minnesota 2011 TB 6 178

Most Popular Articles

Three ways to beat burnout

11/28/2016, 9:45pm MST
By Dave Pond

According to NHL metrics, the average hockey shift lasts somewhere between 45 and 55 seconds. There’s inherent beauty and fluidity to line changes, as skaters come on and off the ice, looking to recharge after going full throttle for their teams.

Meanwhile, your NHL officiating peers are giving their all, too – regularly logging 4-5 miles a game. Those totals are even greater at your level, where you and your colleagues officiate multiple games a day, several times per week, on a seemingly never-ending calendar.

And, although we want to perform our best every game, everyone has both good days and bad – players and officials alike. To learn more about keeping burnout at bay, we went to the experts: longtime amateur hockey scheduler Larry Carrington and former NHL official Mark Faucette.

“There is so much more to officiating than meets the eye,” said Faucette, a 17-year NHL veteran. “It may look easy from the stands, but to maintain total control of a game along with the stress, slumps, supervisors, travel, and fitness regimen takes a very special kind of person.”

Get in shape (and stay there)
We all think we’re in “pretty good” shape, but the reality is, officials must be top athletes and in great condition – even at the youngest levels.

“Conditioning is very important—the deeper into the season, the more important it is,” Carrington said. “Burnout happens physically, mentally, and emotionally. An official who is in good condition will experience less physical burnout, and that will in turn help with the emotional and mental burnout.”

Faucette stresses following a workout routine that maxes yourself at least every other day. Neither player or official should plan to use games as a vehicle toward better physical fitness.

“Where we used to go to camp to get into shape, officials today are on summer conditioning regimens and are tested as soon as they come to camp,” he said. “Taking care of your body is a total focus for the good official.

“The players are so much stronger and faster now, so it’s imperative the officials keep the same pace.”

Find balance
No, not balance on your skates (that’s a given). Rather, make sure to keep the big picture in mind, to work a manageable schedule that includes everything that’s important to you – family, friends, and time away from the rink.

Although it makes Carrington’s job as an assignor more difficult, he said it pays off in the long run.

“I encourage officials to take at least one weekend off to get away from hockey,” he said. “I certainly don't want to lose their services for a week, but the invigoration that it usually provides makes them a much more valuable asset over the course of the season.”

That’s huge in an industry where both mental and physical fatigue are commonplace.

“Every official runs into slumps, just as players do,” Faucette said. “You spend numerous hours alone as an official, and when things are not going good, where everything is negative, it can cause you duress.

“Positive thoughts and self-evaluations speed up recovery,” he continued. “So, instead of telling yourself, ‘I wonder what bad thing will happen tonight?’ say ‘I’m ready for anything – bring it on!’”

Have fun
It’s No. 3 here, but should be No. 1 on your to-do list.

“I realize the officials are all trying hard, and mistakes are part of any sport by any participant,” said Faucette, who currently serves as supervisor of officials for USA Hockey, the NAHL director of player safety and the SPHL director of officiating. “That being said, the joy I get out of seeing a young official start out at ground level and making the big time one day is immeasurable.”

For most of you reading this, the “big time” might not be the end goal (and that’s OK). But wherever you are, there’s experience you’ve gained, as well as that to come – which both point back to why you first got involved in this great sport.

As an assignor, Carrington tries to get out of the office as much as he can and intentionally varies the schedules of his officials to help keep things fresh. He also encourages his more senior officials to lend a hand to those who aren’t as long in the tooth.

“Going to the rink and helping officials help themselves get better can be very invigorating,” he said. “Even a very good, very experienced official will often find it fun and relaxing to mentor some new official at a lower-level game where the stress levels aren’t nearly as high.”

But no matter where you officiate, Carrington emphasizes keeping one thing in mind: the love of the sport and those playing it today.

“If you’re not having fun, you shouldn’t be out there.”

Gerry Letourneau Helps All Rhode Island Kids Get a Chance to Play

12/01/2016, 9:45am MST
By Mike Scandura - Special to USAHockey.com

Founder of Rhode Island Special Hockey works to give equal opportunities

Shadow me

11/29/2016, 10:15am MST
By USA Hockey

Officials in Colorado Springs are benefitting from a shadow program

It was roughly five years ago when Tim Whitten noticed a problem in his association. Whitten, an assignor in the Southern Colorado Hockey Officials Association, observed that while new and young officials were signing up, few were returning the following season.

That’s when he berthed the idea of a shadow program.

Andy Flores, president of SCHOA, took time to tell us more about the program and how the association and its officials are reaping the benefits.

USA Hockey: How exactly did the shadow program come to be? What specific problems were you guys noticing?

Andy Flores:
It started with Tim Whitten. He found that we had a large exit rate, mostly because our newer and younger officials didn’t seem to be comfortable. We would be getting up to 10 new officials a year and we’d lose about 40 percent of them. When that happens, it puts a huge hole in your officials pool. So Tim came up with the idea to have veteran officials shadow newer officials to build their confidence on the ice.

USAH: How does the program work?

Flores:
The program is designed for the new officials, the Level 1s who are in their first year. For the first five games on the ice, they are assigned a shadow. It’s general for a game assignment, a 10U C-level game or something like that. Typically on the ice we will have one senior official, one second-year official and the new officials. The shadow is assigned and works with the new individual. After five games, the shadow identifies if the person needs a little more work or if they are strong and have gained enough knowledge to do it on their own. At that point, they don’t get assigned shadows anymore. If they need a little extra help, they are assigned a shadow as long as they need it.

USAH: Are the shadows technically working the game or are they there as a silent helper?

Flores:
The shadow’s primary job is to teach, not actually officiate. As a shadow you’re not there to influence the game. We don’t work in a capacity where we are working the game. We don’t call offsides, we don’t call icing and we don’t call penalties; it’s strictly educational purposes for the new individual. A shadow is there to give them support and confidence. A simple ‘Yes, you’re making the right call,’ or, ‘I would have maybe called offsides there,’ is what they are there for. That’s why we have shadows work at some of the lower levels of the game, because they are at a stage where coaches aren’t going to go after a ref for minor mistakes and it allows the new officials to learn in an environment where they aren’t necessarily going to get yelled at for everything.

USAH: What’s the feedback been like?

Flores:
The senior guys definitely love it. They enjoy the teaching aspect. That’s why I officiate, because I enjoy teaching the game as well as being a part of it, so for those senior guys, it’s fun to be sharing the knowledge. In Colorado Springs, our experience for our guys ranges anywhere from the NHL, USHL all the way down to the local stuff, so we have a vast array of knowledge. I think the newer officials are enjoying it, too. They keep coming back, so we must be doing something right.

USAH: Has the retention improved then?

Flores:
Absolutely. More than 60-70 percent stay on now for a second year. Plus, we’re getting anywhere from 20 to 30 new guys each year. It’s definitely had a positive impact.

USAH: So you would recommend that other officiating associations give a shadow program like this a try?

Flores:
Absolutely. You take advantage of those prime opportunities to teach at the time they’re occurring. You don’t have to holler across the ice to try and say ‘Hey, do this,’ or, ‘You can’t do that.’ You don’t want to spend time during the game and you don’t want to slow down the game. With the shadow program, you keep the game flowing while teaching. Plus, I can’t speak enough about the retention. People leave officiating because they don’t feel confident. Now we give them that confidence.

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