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Boston, Springfield, Florida are Crowned USPHL Champs

03/26/2014, 1:15pm MDT
By Tom Robinson - Special to USAHockey.com

The Boston Junior Bruins, Springfield Pics and Florida Junior Blades won the first set of junior titles in the United States Premier Hockey League with playoff victories.

Boston won the USPHL’s Premier Division, Springfield won the Elite Division and Florida won the Empire Division.

Boston’s Tim Doherty had a hat trick and Ryan Cloonan scored the game-winner with 58 seconds left March 13 when the Junior Bruins defeated the Jersey Hitmen 5-4 to complete a sweep of the best-of-three Premier Division championship series. Boston rallied to come back after initially going down 2-0.

Springfield edged the Jersey Hitmen 3-2 in overtime in the Elite championship game. Brian Brown scored two goals, including the overtime game-winner, to lead Springfield over Jersey.

The teams had played to a 4-4 tie in the round-robin portion of the tournament a day earlier.

Springfield’s Michael Dion made 33 saves in the championship game after a 14-save shutout when the Pics defeated the Florida Eels 5-0 in the semifinals.

Florida was the USPHL Empire’s top team in both the regular season (37-1-0-2) and playoffs after a 5-2 win over the Boston Junior Bruins in Sunday’s final.

After pounding the South Shore Kings 8-1 in the semifinal, Florida handled Boston in the final, avenging a loss that ended the team’s season in last year’s Empire Junior Hockey League playoffs. Florida’s Chaise Howard had two goals and an assist in the final while Killian Gray, the team’s playoff scoring leader, also scored twice. Eric Sugrue had 44 saves.

Florida advances to the USA Hockey Tier III Junior Nationals April 3-7 in Simsbury, Conn.

PLAYOFF ROUNDUP: Damon Hanson had a goal and two assists Tuesday night when the Helena Bighorns opened the American West Hockey League’s best-of-five championship series with a 5-1 win over the Great Falls Americans.

The win improved Helena to 50-1-1 overall on the season. The Bighorns swept the Billings Bulls in three games in the semifinals. Great Falls eliminated the Gillette Wild in four games.

The regular-season champion New Hampshire Junior Monarchs advanced to the first Eastern hockey League finals, a best-of-five series against the Northern Cyclones, who finished second in the regular season. The finals open Friday in New Hampshire. Both teams made it through three rounds of playoffs.

Brent Beaudoin is New Hampshire’s top playoff scorer with goals in the last four games, including back-to-back two-goal efforts.

Northern is unbeaten in the playoffs, including two wins over the Philadelphia Little Flyers in the semifinals.

The Richmond Generals, North Jersey Avalanche, Boston Bandits and Boston Junior Rangers reached the Metropolitan Hockey League’s Keegan Cup Weekend, which starts Thursday at Middletown, N.J.

The Minnesota Junior Hockey League final four in Oregon, Wis. is set. The Illiana Blackbirds needed three games to get past the Tri City Icehawks, while the Dells Ducks, Hudson Crusaders and Marquette Royales posted two-game sweeps.

Drew Otto scored the game’s first two goals three minutes apart Sunday to lead the Granite City Lumberjacks to a 4-2 victory over the Alexandria Blizzard in the only North American 3 Hockey League first-round playoff series to go three games.

The other first-round NA3HL series were decided in two games each. Granite City will face the defending NA3HL champion North Iowa Bulls in the West Division Finals. The St. Louis Junior Blues and Peoria Mustangs will play in the Central Division, the Cleveland Junior Lumberjacks and Flint Junior Generals will meet in the East Division, and the Dallas Stars and Topeka Capitals will meet in the South.

The winners of the four divisional series will go to the Silver Cup Championship Tournament March 27-30 in Geneva, Ill.

Dallas defenseman Alex MacInnis had just 15 points in 35 regular-season games, but he had five points, including four goals, in two playoff games against the Sugar Land Imperials to open the postseason. MacInnis had two goals in a 4-3 opening win Thursday, then two goals and an assist in a 10-1 rout Friday.

NAHL TITLE RACE: The Topeka RoadRunners closed to within one point of the defending North American Hockey League champion Amarillo Bulls in the Southern Division race with a 3-2 overtime win Monday night followed by a 1-0 victory Tuesday when the two teams went head-to-head. James Ring had the game-winning goal in both games.

Topeka’s P.J. Bridges made 21 saves Tuesday to match the NAHL modern record with his 10th shutout of the season. Robert Nichols had 10 shutouts for the Wenatchee Wild two years ago.

COLLEGE COMMITMENTS: Nikolas Olsson, a forward with the Sioux City Musketeers of the United States Hockey League, has committed to Boston University. The 19-year-old from Escondido, Calif. has played four seasons in the USHL, including two with Team USA. He has three goals and four assists while going plus-4 in 34 games this season.

Hayden Hawkey, the USHL leader in two major goaltending statistics, has decided to continue his career with Providence College. The 19-year-old from Parker, Colo. has a 1.85 goals-against average and .929 save percentage with the Omaha Lancers to lead the league.

Wenatchee goalie Chase Perry has committed to Colorado College. Perry, 18, from Andover, Minn., has a 2.32 GAA and .907 save percentage in the NAHL. He was ranked as the No. 4 North American goaltender in the latest NHL Central Scouting mid-term rankings.

Cody Champagne, a defenseman with the NAHL’s Topeka RoadRunners, has committed to the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The 19-year-old from Brookfield, Conn. is the team’s top scoring defenseman with 23 points in 54 games.

Brett Gervais, a center with the Fairbanks Ice Dogs of the NAHL, has committed to Clarkson University. The 19-year-old from Corona, Calif. has 22 goals and 16 assists in 56 games for the West Division leaders.

Jay Dickman followed up making his commitment to Bemidji State University by earning NAHL Central Division Star of the Week honors. Dickman, a 20-year-old from Shoreview, Minn., had four goals and an assist in two weekend wins. The 6-foot-6, 225-pounder is second in the league with 60 points in 55 games.

Story from Red Line Editorial, Inc.

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Three ways to beat burnout

11/28/2016, 9:45pm MST
By Dave Pond

According to NHL metrics, the average hockey shift lasts somewhere between 45 and 55 seconds. There’s inherent beauty and fluidity to line changes, as skaters come on and off the ice, looking to recharge after going full throttle for their teams.

Meanwhile, your NHL officiating peers are giving their all, too – regularly logging 4-5 miles a game. Those totals are even greater at your level, where you and your colleagues officiate multiple games a day, several times per week, on a seemingly never-ending calendar.

And, although we want to perform our best every game, everyone has both good days and bad – players and officials alike. To learn more about keeping burnout at bay, we went to the experts: longtime amateur hockey scheduler Larry Carrington and former NHL official Mark Faucette.

“There is so much more to officiating than meets the eye,” said Faucette, a 17-year NHL veteran. “It may look easy from the stands, but to maintain total control of a game along with the stress, slumps, supervisors, travel, and fitness regimen takes a very special kind of person.”

Get in shape (and stay there)
We all think we’re in “pretty good” shape, but the reality is, officials must be top athletes and in great condition – even at the youngest levels.

“Conditioning is very important—the deeper into the season, the more important it is,” Carrington said. “Burnout happens physically, mentally, and emotionally. An official who is in good condition will experience less physical burnout, and that will in turn help with the emotional and mental burnout.”

Faucette stresses following a workout routine that maxes yourself at least every other day. Neither player or official should plan to use games as a vehicle toward better physical fitness.

“Where we used to go to camp to get into shape, officials today are on summer conditioning regimens and are tested as soon as they come to camp,” he said. “Taking care of your body is a total focus for the good official.

“The players are so much stronger and faster now, so it’s imperative the officials keep the same pace.”

Find balance
No, not balance on your skates (that’s a given). Rather, make sure to keep the big picture in mind, to work a manageable schedule that includes everything that’s important to you – family, friends, and time away from the rink.

Although it makes Carrington’s job as an assignor more difficult, he said it pays off in the long run.

“I encourage officials to take at least one weekend off to get away from hockey,” he said. “I certainly don't want to lose their services for a week, but the invigoration that it usually provides makes them a much more valuable asset over the course of the season.”

That’s huge in an industry where both mental and physical fatigue are commonplace.

“Every official runs into slumps, just as players do,” Faucette said. “You spend numerous hours alone as an official, and when things are not going good, where everything is negative, it can cause you duress.

“Positive thoughts and self-evaluations speed up recovery,” he continued. “So, instead of telling yourself, ‘I wonder what bad thing will happen tonight?’ say ‘I’m ready for anything – bring it on!’”

Have fun
It’s No. 3 here, but should be No. 1 on your to-do list.

“I realize the officials are all trying hard, and mistakes are part of any sport by any participant,” said Faucette, who currently serves as supervisor of officials for USA Hockey, the NAHL director of player safety and the SPHL director of officiating. “That being said, the joy I get out of seeing a young official start out at ground level and making the big time one day is immeasurable.”

For most of you reading this, the “big time” might not be the end goal (and that’s OK). But wherever you are, there’s experience you’ve gained, as well as that to come – which both point back to why you first got involved in this great sport.

As an assignor, Carrington tries to get out of the office as much as he can and intentionally varies the schedules of his officials to help keep things fresh. He also encourages his more senior officials to lend a hand to those who aren’t as long in the tooth.

“Going to the rink and helping officials help themselves get better can be very invigorating,” he said. “Even a very good, very experienced official will often find it fun and relaxing to mentor some new official at a lower-level game where the stress levels aren’t nearly as high.”

But no matter where you officiate, Carrington emphasizes keeping one thing in mind: the love of the sport and those playing it today.

“If you’re not having fun, you shouldn’t be out there.”

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By Harry Thompson - USA Hockey Magazine

Bill Belisle has coached for the past 42 seasons

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