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Julie Chu selected as Closing Ceremony flag bearer for 2014 U.S. Olympic Team

02/21/2014, 5:15am MST
By USAHockey.com

SOCHI, Russia – Women’s ice hockey forward Julie Chu was today selected to lead the 2014 U.S. Olympic Team into Sunday's (Feb. 23) Closing Ceremony as flag bearer, as announced today by the United States Olympic Committee. Chu was chosen by a vote of fellow members of Team USA.

A four-time Olympian and the most veteran member of the women’s hockey team, Chu has medaled with Team USA at every Olympic Winter Games dating back to 2002 – earning silver three times (2002, 2010, 2014) and once claiming bronze (2006). She is tied as the second most decorated U.S. female in Olympic Winter Games history.

Having joined the U.S. Women’s National Hockey Team in 2000, she captained the U.S. to the 2013 World Championship gold medal and back-to-back Four Nations Cup titles in 2011 and 2012. In total, she’s competed in nine world championships, winning gold five times.

“I'm completely humbled and kind of in shock; I never imagined that this would happen, especially knowing how strong the U.S. delegation is,” said Chu. “Our team has so many inspiring athletes who I've gotten a chance to root for. This is special and I don't take it lightly. Thank you for this great honor.”

“Today, Julie joins a distinguished group of athletes who have been selected to serve as flag bearer for Team USA, and I’m thrilled to congratulate her on this honor,” said USOC CEO Scott Blackmun. “She has been a tremendous ambassador for her sport and our athletes, and will continue to be a world-class representative of our nation at the Closing Ceremony and beyond."

Chu is the second ice hockey player to serve as flag bearer for Team USA. Cammi Granato first held the honor in 1998 after leading the U.S. women to the inaugural Olympic gold medal at the Nagano Games.  

U.S. OLYMPIC TEAM FLAG BEARERS – CLOSING CEREMONY
1960     Donald McDermott, Speedskating
1964     Jean Saubert, Alpine Skiing
1968     Tim Wood, Figure Skating
1972     Barbara Ann Cochran, Alpine Skiing
1976     Sheila Young, Speedskating
1980     Eric Heiden, Speedskating
1984     Phil Mahre, Alpine Skiing
1988     Bonnie Blair, Speedskating
1992     Bonnie Blair, Speedskating
1994     Dan Jansen, Speedskating
1998     Cammi Granato, Ice Hockey
2002     Brian Shimer, Bobsled
2006     Joey Cheek, Speedskating
2010     Bill Demong, Nordic Combined
2014     Julie Chu, Ice Hockey

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