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Eating right is part of the game for Lyndsey Fry

12/12/2013, 6:00pm MST
By Justin A. Rice - Special to USAHockey.com

Lyndsey Fry said she’s a “nut” when it comes to eating healthy. But over Thanksgiving, Fry, one of 23 women competing for 21 spots on Team USA for the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games, took a break not only from hockey but also from counting calories.

“Well, I’m a pretty big believer that sometimes when it comes to food, as far as the negative affects of eating badly for a day or two, I think the positive mental affects outweigh the negative healthy affects,” Fry said Tuesday, after she returned from her Thanksgiving holiday in Arizona. “I enjoyed my Thanksgiving. I definitely went for an extra plate or two.

“I didn’t track [calories] when I was home; I just made smart choices. Now I’m back to tracking it.”

The 21-year-old Harvard University student estimated that she burns close to 800 to 900 calories in a two-hour practice with the U.S. Olympic Women’s Team, which is training in Bedford, Mass., just outside Boston.

“It depends on the drills we’re doing and how much standing around,” she said. “It’s a lot of calories, and if you add an off-ice workout during the day you definitely burn a lot more.”

She said she takes in about 2,400 calories a day, not counting Thanksgiving of course.

“I could probably eat more and be fine, but I am still trying to very slowly lean out,” she said. “It’s been a long process over the years. I probably eat less than some of my teammates, but not to the point where I’m under eating.”

That mentality obviously went out the door during Thanksgiving dinner at her aunt’s house.

“I never used to be a stuffing kid,” she said when asked about her favorite sides. “I did not enjoy stuffing until now.”

But Fry, who also knows her way around a kitchen, said she didn’t totally pig out on Thanksgiving. She said she made an upside down pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving with more healthy ingredients than traditional pumpkin pie.

“I baked it myself, and instead of crust I used low fat gram crackers on top,” she said. “I made that. That was pretty good.”

She also made a breakfast hash while she was home and a spaghetti squash.

Fry said she heeded her coaches’ advice before the team broke up for the holiday break.

“When we left they said enjoy your break, but don’t forget this is a job,” Fry said. “When you take that mentality, I’m not going to sit on my butt eating turkey and ice cream at home. I’m going to make smart choices, and I’m sure most of us did.”

Fry didn’t bring her hockey gear home, but ice skating was mostly out of the question anyhow since she spent the long weekend in Arizona. Along with teammate Megan Bozek — who also spent the weekend in Arizona at her brother’s house — Fry believes she spent the weekend in the warmest climate of anyone on the team.

Going from the cold Massachusetts climate to Arizona and then back to the cold again made the team’s first practice after Thanksgiving a bit difficult on Fry’s lungs.

“My lungs were burning because I didn’t have any cold air in my lungs,” she said. “It was 65 [degrees] at home.”

Otherwise, she said she felt refreshed after the break, especially since they had two weeks of hard practice going into Thanksgiving.

“I think it was really good mentally and physically having a break,” she said. “I’m not sore from yesterday. I feel pretty good. I think the break was definitely needed.”

Especially since practices will only get more intense as the team inches closer to cutting the roster down to the 21 players that will go to the Winter Games. That roster will be announced during the 2014 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic in Detroit on Jan. 1.

If Fry makes the team, it would not only be the realization of her own childhood dream, but it would also fulfill a teenage pledge she made with her best friend and teammate, Liz Turgeon, who was killed in a car crash in 2010 near Albuquerque, N.M.

“It would be absolutely incredible for so many reasons,” said Fry, who is featured on the cover of USA Hockey Magazine this month holding Turgeon’s jersey. “There’s been a big focus lately with me and the story with Liz and the promise we had and that absolutely holds true.

“But it’s not just for her. It’s for my family and everyone who ever supported me. My Harvard friends, kids growing up, so many people. If I can take all that to the Olympics, that would be the greatest feeling in the world. It would be the ultimate way for me to give back to everyone who’s played a role in my life.”

 

Story from Red Line Editorial, Inc.

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Called up to The Show

09/26/2016, 10:45am MDT
By Kelly Erickson

Three USA Hockey officials earn the chance to officiate in the NHL for the first time this season

For the majority of young hockey players, their dream is to skate in the National Hockey League. They want to be the next Zach Parise, Patrick Kane, Ryan Suter — the list goes on. This season, starting in NHL training camps, three young Americans will make their dream a reality, with one caveat — instead of playing, they’ll be officiating.

Ryan Daisy, Furman South and Cameron Voss, three USA Hockey officials, were each recently offered NHL contracts and will attend their first NHL training camps this fall.

“It’s been a dream come true, really,” South said. “I’ve dreamt of being in the NHL my whole life. I grew up playing hockey from a young age and have been a hockey fan my whole life. Ever since I learned to skate it was always a dream of mine to be in the NHL. For most of my life I have dreamt of being there as a player, but once I was done playing, my dream was to make it as an official. And I made it. I can’t wait to have my first NHL game.”

Daisy echoed the sentiment, noting that making it to the NHL level as an official has been a goal of his for awhile.

“It feels awesome,” Daisy said. “I’m sure there will be a lot of emotions going on in my first game, the first time I touch the ice in the NHL with the NHL crest on my sweater that I’ve been dreaming about for years. I’m definitely looking forward to it.”

It’s a dream made reality for all three, and the ultimate payoff for many years of hard work and sacrifice.

“It’s an accumulation of all the sacrifices my family has made for me, all the supervisors and friends along the way that have helped me,” Voss said. “It wasn’t just me, it was a collection of people that pushed me and made me believe and work hard. It’s a pretty overwhelming feeling being at this point. I’m just glad all the sacrifices that we’ve made have paid off. I’m very blessed and humbled by the whole experience.”

Voss, South and Daisy were drawn to officiating from different paths, but once on it, they both climbed through the ranks and took advantage of the USA Hockey officiating development initiatives, including summer camps and the USA Hockey Officiating Program for South and Daisy to hone their skills.

Voss was the first of the three to don the zebra stripes, becoming an official at age 12, working alongside his father. It was his way to help pay for his hockey gear and get extra ice time. After closing his collegiate career at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota, pursuing a career as a ref became a reality. He attended an officiating summer camp and saw all the opportunities available to work in higher-level hockey, and before long, he was working his way through them, spending time at the youth, high school, junior, NCAA Division I and professional levels in the American League.

“My eyes lit up really wide and I was just eager to start the process,” Voss said.

“USA Hockey gave me lots of opportunities to learn and hone my craft. The people involved in USA Hockey, they sacrificed a lot of time … they helped me out tremendously, especially at the grassroots level. They let me learn and grow and even let me fail and learn from those experiences. USA Hockey helped me from when I first started when I was 12 to when I got the call (from the NHL) in July.”

South played NCAA hockey at Robert Morris University. When he graduated in 2012 at age 24, he simply wanted to find a way to stay involved in the sport about which he was so passionate. He tried coaching, he instructed at camps and then he got a chance to ref a game and he loved it. He’s officiated everywhere from high school up, spending last season in the American Hockey League.

“It kind of came naturally to me and I realized it was something I wanted to pursue,” South said. “A couple of years later, it seems to have worked out.”

Daisy was drawn to officiating because it was a way to be in the game, to skate on the ice. His dream of becoming an official firmly solidified when he joined the USA Hockey Officiating Development Program during his senior year of college. With some early success, he was offered a contract to work in the United States Hockey League full-time, fueling his aspirations.

“(USA Hockey) will do everything in their power to help you achieve your dreams, no matter what level of hockey it is,” Daisy said.

From his Level 1 seminar to summer camps to his job in the USHL, Daisy has felt extreme support from every manager and mentor along the way, noting they all wanted to help him be a better official.

“You’re learning from the best,” Daisy said. “You’re learning from guys that are either currently in the NHL, have been in the NHL, officials that have worked international hockey and college hockey. They’re out there helping you become better.”

South also credits the USA Hockey Officiating Development Program as a factor in his success, noting Scott Zelkin, the Officiating Development Program manager, and the program itself gave him every opportunity to succeed as an official. To make his dreams come true.

“I can’t say enough about USA Hockey and the Officiating Development Program,” South said. “I wouldn’t have had this chance with the NHL if it wasn’t for those guys, that’s for sure.”

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