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Deutschland Cup staff named

10/11/2011, 9:45am MDT
By USA Hockey

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - USA Hockey today announced its staff for the 2011 U.S. Men's National Select Team that will compete at the Deutschland Cup, Nov. 11-13, in Munich, Germany.

Jim Johannson, USA Hockey's assistant executive director of hockey operations, will serve as general manager of the team, while Don Waddell, whose distinguished 25-year professional career has included stints as a head coach in both the National Hockey League and International Hockey League, has been named the head coach of Team USA.

Chris Chelios, advisor to hockey operations of the NHL's Detroit Red Wings, and Bill Guerin, player development coach of the NHL's Pittsburgh Penguins, join Waddell as assistant coaches.

USA Hockey also announced the following support staff for the 2011 U.S. Men's Select Team: BobWebster, team leader; Scott Aldrich, equipment manager; Stan Wong, athletic trainer; Peewee Willmann, massage therapist; and Mike Shindle, team doctor.

NOTES: The Deutschland Cup has been held every year since 1987 and will feature Germany, Slovakia, Switzerland and the United States ... Team USA has participated in the Deutschland Cup on six different occasions (2002-05, 2007, 2009) ... The U.S. won the tournament in 2003 and 2004, garnered second-place finishes in 2007 and 2009 and finished third in 2005 ... The U.S. Men's National Team Advisory Group, comprised of Brian Burke, David Poile, Don Waddell, Ray Shero, Paul Holmgren, Dean Lombardi, and Dale Tallon, was formed in Feb. of 2007 and assists USA Hockey in the selection of staff and players for all U.S. Men's National Teams.

ABOUT JOHANNSON:

In his 12th year at USA Hockey and fifth as assistant executive director of hockey operations, Johannson is responsible for the day-to-day management and integration of all in-sport related initiatives.

A two-time Olympian as a player (1988, 1992), Johansson was part of the management team for the silver medal-winning 2010 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team in Vancouver, B.C. He served as the senior director of hockey operations for Team USA at the 2006 Olympic Winter Games in Torino, Italy, and was the team leader of the silver medal-winning U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Johannson, who will serve as general manager of the 2012 U.S. National Junior Team, has worked with 11 previous U.S. National Junior Teams, including as general manager of the bronze medal-winning 2011 U.S. National Junior Team and the gold medal-winning 2010 U.S. National Junior Team.

Johannson, who played college hockey at the University of Wisconsin, spent five years as the general manager of the Twin Cities Vulcans, a Junior A team in the United States Hockey League. Under his guidance, the Vulcans captured the 2000 USA Hockey Junior A National Championship in Green Bay, Wis.

ABOUT WADDELL:

A former National Hockey League and International Hockey League head coach, Waddell took his first position behind the bench in 1988 following a lengthy professional playing career. After serving as a player-assistant coach for the IHL’s Flint Spirits during the 1987-88 season, he took over the reins as head coach for two seasons (1988-90) and led them to a playoff appearance his second campaign.

Waddell accepted the head coaching position with the IHL’s San Diego Gulls for the 1991-92 season, and led the club to a 45-28-0 record and a playoff appearance. He then moved to the administrative side of the game, and was named the IHL’s Executive of the Year in 1993 and 1996. Waddell eventually became an assistant general manager of the NHL’s Detroit Red Wings, and helped guide the club to its second straight Stanley Cup in 1998.

Beginning in 1998, Waddell became the general manager of the Atlanta Thrashers, a position he held until 2010 when he was named the team’s president. During that time, he served as head coach of the Thrashers for most of the 2007-08 season, leading the club to a 34-34-8 record.

A member of the U.S. Men's National Team Advisory Group since its inception in 2007, Waddell has played an instrumental role in the selection process of U.S. Men's National Teams that compete in the Olympic Winter Games and the International Ice Hockey Federations Men's World Championships. Additionally, Waddell served as the general manager of the 2006 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team that competed in Torino, Italy. He also served as the general manager of Team USA at three IIHF Men's World Championships (2001, 2002, 2005).

ABOUT CHELIOS:

Chelios is in his second season as advisor to hockey operations of the Detroit Red Wings. He works closely with the Red Wings front office staff, as well as the team's coaching staff to provide insight on a wide range of on-ice issues.

Chelios, who will be inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame on Dec. 12 in Chicago, played 26 seasons in the NHL for the Montreal Canadiens, Chicago Blackhawks, Detroit Red Wings and Atlanta Thrashers. Chelios won three Stanley Cups (1986, 2002, 2008) and three Norris Trophies (1989, 1993, 1996) and is the all-time leader in games played by a defenseman in NHL history (1,651).

Internationally, Chelios is one of only two male players to represent the United States at four Olympic Winter Games (1984, 1998, 2002, 2006) and captained his final three Olympic squads. He also helped the U.S. defeat Canada in the 1996 World Cup of Hockey, one of 10 total times he represented the U.S. on the international stage.

ABOUT GUERIN:

Guerin is in his first season as player development coach for the Pittsburgh Penguins and works with young prospects throughout the Penguins organization.

A two-time Stanley Cup champion (1995, 2009), Guerin played 18 seasons in the NHL with eight different teams, scoring 429 goals and recording 856 points. Guerin posted two 40-goal seasons, scored 30 or more goals five times and 20 or more 13 times. The winger also played in four NHL All-Star games.

On the international stage, Guerin earned a silver medal with the U.S. Olympic Men’s Ice Hockey Team at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City and helped the United States capture the first-ever World Cup of Hockey crown in 1996. In all, Guerin represented the U.S. in seven international events.

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Three ways to beat burnout

11/28/2016, 9:45pm MST
By Dave Pond

According to NHL metrics, the average hockey shift lasts somewhere between 45 and 55 seconds. There’s inherent beauty and fluidity to line changes, as skaters come on and off the ice, looking to recharge after going full throttle for their teams.

Meanwhile, your NHL officiating peers are giving their all, too – regularly logging 4-5 miles a game. Those totals are even greater at your level, where you and your colleagues officiate multiple games a day, several times per week, on a seemingly never-ending calendar.

And, although we want to perform our best every game, everyone has both good days and bad – players and officials alike. To learn more about keeping burnout at bay, we went to the experts: longtime amateur hockey scheduler Larry Carrington and former NHL official Mark Faucette.

“There is so much more to officiating than meets the eye,” said Faucette, a 17-year NHL veteran. “It may look easy from the stands, but to maintain total control of a game along with the stress, slumps, supervisors, travel, and fitness regimen takes a very special kind of person.”

Get in shape (and stay there)
We all think we’re in “pretty good” shape, but the reality is, officials must be top athletes and in great condition – even at the youngest levels.

“Conditioning is very important—the deeper into the season, the more important it is,” Carrington said. “Burnout happens physically, mentally, and emotionally. An official who is in good condition will experience less physical burnout, and that will in turn help with the emotional and mental burnout.”

Faucette stresses following a workout routine that maxes yourself at least every other day. Neither player or official should plan to use games as a vehicle toward better physical fitness.

“Where we used to go to camp to get into shape, officials today are on summer conditioning regimens and are tested as soon as they come to camp,” he said. “Taking care of your body is a total focus for the good official.

“The players are so much stronger and faster now, so it’s imperative the officials keep the same pace.”

Find balance
No, not balance on your skates (that’s a given). Rather, make sure to keep the big picture in mind, to work a manageable schedule that includes everything that’s important to you – family, friends, and time away from the rink.

Although it makes Carrington’s job as an assignor more difficult, he said it pays off in the long run.

“I encourage officials to take at least one weekend off to get away from hockey,” he said. “I certainly don't want to lose their services for a week, but the invigoration that it usually provides makes them a much more valuable asset over the course of the season.”

That’s huge in an industry where both mental and physical fatigue are commonplace.

“Every official runs into slumps, just as players do,” Faucette said. “You spend numerous hours alone as an official, and when things are not going good, where everything is negative, it can cause you duress.

“Positive thoughts and self-evaluations speed up recovery,” he continued. “So, instead of telling yourself, ‘I wonder what bad thing will happen tonight?’ say ‘I’m ready for anything – bring it on!’”

Have fun
It’s No. 3 here, but should be No. 1 on your to-do list.

“I realize the officials are all trying hard, and mistakes are part of any sport by any participant,” said Faucette, who currently serves as supervisor of officials for USA Hockey, the NAHL director of player safety and the SPHL director of officiating. “That being said, the joy I get out of seeing a young official start out at ground level and making the big time one day is immeasurable.”

For most of you reading this, the “big time” might not be the end goal (and that’s OK). But wherever you are, there’s experience you’ve gained, as well as that to come – which both point back to why you first got involved in this great sport.

As an assignor, Carrington tries to get out of the office as much as he can and intentionally varies the schedules of his officials to help keep things fresh. He also encourages his more senior officials to lend a hand to those who aren’t as long in the tooth.

“Going to the rink and helping officials help themselves get better can be very invigorating,” he said. “Even a very good, very experienced official will often find it fun and relaxing to mentor some new official at a lower-level game where the stress levels aren’t nearly as high.”

But no matter where you officiate, Carrington emphasizes keeping one thing in mind: the love of the sport and those playing it today.

“If you’re not having fun, you shouldn’t be out there.”

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Shadow me

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By USA Hockey

Officials in Colorado Springs are benefitting from a shadow program

It was roughly five years ago when Tim Whitten noticed a problem in his association. Whitten, an assignor in the Southern Colorado Hockey Officials Association, observed that while new and young officials were signing up, few were returning the following season.

That’s when he berthed the idea of a shadow program.

Andy Flores, president of SCHOA, took time to tell us more about the program and how the association and its officials are reaping the benefits.

USA Hockey: How exactly did the shadow program come to be? What specific problems were you guys noticing?

Andy Flores:
It started with Tim Whitten. He found that we had a large exit rate, mostly because our newer and younger officials didn’t seem to be comfortable. We would be getting up to 10 new officials a year and we’d lose about 40 percent of them. When that happens, it puts a huge hole in your officials pool. So Tim came up with the idea to have veteran officials shadow newer officials to build their confidence on the ice.

USAH: How does the program work?

Flores:
The program is designed for the new officials, the Level 1s who are in their first year. For the first five games on the ice, they are assigned a shadow. It’s general for a game assignment, a 10U C-level game or something like that. Typically on the ice we will have one senior official, one second-year official and the new officials. The shadow is assigned and works with the new individual. After five games, the shadow identifies if the person needs a little more work or if they are strong and have gained enough knowledge to do it on their own. At that point, they don’t get assigned shadows anymore. If they need a little extra help, they are assigned a shadow as long as they need it.

USAH: Are the shadows technically working the game or are they there as a silent helper?

Flores:
The shadow’s primary job is to teach, not actually officiate. As a shadow you’re not there to influence the game. We don’t work in a capacity where we are working the game. We don’t call offsides, we don’t call icing and we don’t call penalties; it’s strictly educational purposes for the new individual. A shadow is there to give them support and confidence. A simple ‘Yes, you’re making the right call,’ or, ‘I would have maybe called offsides there,’ is what they are there for. That’s why we have shadows work at some of the lower levels of the game, because they are at a stage where coaches aren’t going to go after a ref for minor mistakes and it allows the new officials to learn in an environment where they aren’t necessarily going to get yelled at for everything.

USAH: What’s the feedback been like?

Flores:
The senior guys definitely love it. They enjoy the teaching aspect. That’s why I officiate, because I enjoy teaching the game as well as being a part of it, so for those senior guys, it’s fun to be sharing the knowledge. In Colorado Springs, our experience for our guys ranges anywhere from the NHL, USHL all the way down to the local stuff, so we have a vast array of knowledge. I think the newer officials are enjoying it, too. They keep coming back, so we must be doing something right.

USAH: Has the retention improved then?

Flores:
Absolutely. More than 60-70 percent stay on now for a second year. Plus, we’re getting anywhere from 20 to 30 new guys each year. It’s definitely had a positive impact.

USAH: So you would recommend that other officiating associations give a shadow program like this a try?

Flores:
Absolutely. You take advantage of those prime opportunities to teach at the time they’re occurring. You don’t have to holler across the ice to try and say ‘Hey, do this,’ or, ‘You can’t do that.’ You don’t want to spend time during the game and you don’t want to slow down the game. With the shadow program, you keep the game flowing while teaching. Plus, I can’t speak enough about the retention. People leave officiating because they don’t feel confident. Now we give them that confidence.

Tag(s): Deutschland Cup