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Americans Brown, Quick lead LA to Cup

06/11/2013, 1:15pm MDT
By USA Hockey

LOS ANGELES -- This is a city of glitz and glamor, so the pregame video just before the Los Angeles Kings have taken the ice at Staples Center during the 2012 Stanley Cup Playoffs appropriately is accompanied by multicolored spotlights, a laser show and images projected onto the playing surface.

The heart of the video, though, goes to the soul of this sport. There are pictures of the Kings in their youth, boys wearing over-sized hockey equipment who dreamed of reaching the pinnacle of the sport they loved.

The boys in those faded photos arrived there Monday night.

Los Angeles, on the strength of three power-play goals in the first period, finished off the New Jersey Devils with a 6-1 victory in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, earning the franchise's first championship in its 45-year history.

"They've been waiting longer than I have, this city," captain Dustin Brown said. "You dream of winning the Cup, and you know what, I'm glad I was the first King to ever lift it."

The victory caps one of the most remarkable postseason runs in League history. Los Angeles was in 11th place in the Western Conference with 14 games remaining in the regular season, and the Kings didn't earn a spot in the postseason until during Game No. 81.

From that point, the Kings were nearly unstoppable. Los Angeles became the first No. 8 seed to win the Cup, the first team to defeat the top three teams in its conference and the first team with any seed to win the first three games of all four series, including the first two on the road in each round.

Read more of the recap >> 

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There’s a component of body-contact training that happens at every level, from cross-ice 8U to small-area battle drills for older players, but the idea of a body checking-specific teaching event for tweens and teens seemed a beneficial complement to that team-level training, so Rhody ran with it.

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